House Democrats to release impeachment report — live updates

BY MELISSA QUINN, GRACE SEGERS, KATHRYN WATSON AND STEFAN BECKET

Latest updates on the impeachment inquiry

The House Intelligence Committee plans to release its report on President Trump and Ukraine on Tuesday.
Republicans finished their own report on the investigation, accusing Democrats of conducting “an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system.”
The Judiciary Committee is gearing up for its first hearing in the impeachment probe, scheduled for Wednesday.
The White House says it won’t participate in the hearing, calling the impeachment inquiry “baseless” and “partisan.”

Washington — House Democrats on the Intelligence Committee plan to release their report with findings from the first phase of the impeachment inquiry on Tuesday before turning over the impeachment inquiry to the House Judiciary Committee, which will hold its first hearing on Wednesday.

Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said on MSNBC that Democrats are finalizing the report and plan to release it publicly.

“We are putting the finishing touches on the report which will be publicly released tomorrow,” he said on “The Rachel Maddow Show” Monday evening.

Schiff said the Intelligence Committee will continue its investigation even after Judiciary takes the lead on impeachment.

“While that process is going on, we don’t intend to be static,” he said. “If we learned new information that will build on what we know already, we will file a supplemental report with the Judiciary Committee.”

Intelligence Committee members returning from the Thanksgiving break began going over the draft on Capitol Hill on Monday evening. The committee will meet Tuesday at 6 p.m. to vote on adopting the report before sending it to the Judiciary Committee, along with a separate report prepared by Republican members.

In their report, House Republicans defended the president’s dealings with Ukraine and accused Democrats of trying to overturn the results of the 2016 election.

The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hold its first hearing in the impeachment probe on Wednesday. Lawmakers will hear from four constitutional law experts about the history of impeachment and what constitutes an “impeachable offense.” Republicans on the Judiciary Committee demanded the addition of other witnesses to showcase a “wider array of perspectives regarding impeachment.”

​Schiff: Republican report “intended for an audience of one”
Monday, 6:42 p.m.: Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff reacted to the Republicans’ impeachment report, accusing the minority of ignoring evidence of wrongdoing by the president.

“The Minority’s rebuttal document, intended for an audience of one, ignores voluminous evidence that the president used the power of his office to pressure Ukraine into investigating his political rival by withholding military aid and a White House meeting the President of Ukraine desperately sought. In so doing, the President undermined our national security and the integrity of our elections,” he said.

“Tellingly, the Minority dismisses this as just part of the President’s ‘outside the beltway’ thinking. It is more accurately, outside the law and constitution, and a violation of his oath of office,” he added. — Stefan Becket

Judiciary Committee announces witnesses for Wednesday’s hearing
4:17 p.m.: The House Judiciary Committee released the names of the four people who will appear in Wednesday’s impeachment hearing, which is titled “The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment.” They are:

Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard Law School
Pamela S. Karlan, a professor of public interest law at Stanford Law School and the co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic
Michael Gerhardt, a University of North Carolina law professor of jurisprudence
Jonathan Turley, a professor of public interest law at George Washington University and a CBS News legal analyst
— Caroline Cournoyer

​Top Republican on Judiciary Committee slams Democrats over hearing
Monday, 4:10 p.m.: Less than 48 hours before the first impeachment hearing in the House Judiciary Committee, the committee’s highest-ranking Republican accused Democrats of violating the minority party’s rights and conducting an unfair impeachment process.

In a letter to Democratic Chairman Jerry Nadler, ranking member Doug Collins complained that neither the witness list for Wednesday’s hearing nor the report from the House Intelligence Committee have been publicized. Without those, Collins said the committee will have to weigh impeachment “without any evidence for us to review.”

The Intelligence Committee, however, held weeks of closed-door and televised hearings with more than a dozen witnesses, and nearly all of the transcripts of the closed-door sessions have been released.

The Intelligence Committee is scheduled to meet Tuesday to consider the report, a draft of which will be made available to members Monday evening. Chairman Adam Schiff said last week that their findings will be given to the Judiciary Committee “soon after Congress returns from the Thanksgiving recess.”

The Judiciary Committee released the witnesses for Wednesday’s hearing shortly after the release of Collins’ letter.

Collins also pointed out that a former Democratic representative, Jane Harman, said on Sunday that “the process is being rushed.” — Caroline Cournoyer

House Republicans defend Trump on Ukraine in impeachment report

Monday, 3:45 p.m.: House Republicans have finished a report detailing their conclusions from the initial stages of the impeachment investigation, issuing a staunch defense of President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine and accusing Democrats of conducting “an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system.”

The 110-page report, written by Republican staffers on the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight Committees, is meant to supplement the Democrats’ report on their findings.

The Republicans’ report argues that the evidence collected over nearly two months of private and public testimony does not support the allegations at the center of the impeachment inquiry, which they portray as an attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 campaign.

“The Democrats’ impeachment inquiry is not the organic outgrowth of serious misconduct; it is an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system,” it says. “The Democrats are trying to impeach a duly elected President based on the accusations and assumptions of unelected bureaucrats who disagreed with President Trump’s policy initiatives and processes.” — Stefan Becket and Arden Farhi