Concerns Over State of Fort Charles

 

The General Manager of the Brimstone Hill National Park Society, Mr. Cameron Gill indicated that after its usage ended in the 1990s the fort started a process of decay. He added because of the historic link between Fort Charles and Brimstone Hill, the management of Brimstone Hill has always been concerned about the deterioration.

Sometime ago Brimstone Hill’s management  submitted a proposal to government, where the society offered to manage the site, while it remained the property of the government and the people of St. Kitts and Nevis, but would be restored and managed on behalf of the people. Gill explained however that there was no response to the proposal.

It is now understood that an assessment will be done on the site to find out the overall conditions. This would guide any decision that can be made on the way forward, in protecting and restoring it, before placing another proposal to the government.

Gill added, “This fort should be remembered, and I am using the occasion of the ‘International Day for Monuments & Sites’, to point out the importance of this fort in our history, in terms of our heritage and social history.”

International Day for Monuments & Sites is a day that offers an opportunity to raise public awareness, concerning the diversity of the world’s heritage and the efforts that are required to protect and conserve it, as well as to draw attention to its vulnerability. It is celebrated on 18th April annually.

Charles Fort was a military post from 1670 until it was abandoned in 1854. Some forty years later in 1890 it was used as the Hansen Home (leper asylum). The Home was closed in 1996.

 

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