Damian Marley Wows Festival Audience

Damian Marley proved why his family is still revered as the “royal family” of reggae music. He obviously understood the thirst of the ardent fans, (many who flocked the front stage area), delivering successive tunes that all seemed like crowd favourites.moga

Damian ‘Jr. Gong’ Marley lived up to the hype of being the headline artiste of the evening, rolling out many of his popular songs which included ‘Beautiful’ and ‘Road to Zion’.

It was a scintillating two hour performance that also revived memories of “Brother Bob”, when Damian introduced a few of his father’s more popular selections, such as “Could you be Loved”.

Friday night at the St. Kitts Music Festival, which traditionally has been called, “Reggae Night”, again proved that this is a winning formula for the event, as it was able to draw one of the largest crowds seen at the annual affair. It was an audience richly blended with visitors and residents, including the usual large pool of members of the Rastafarian faith, who could always be counted on to show support, especially for the more “rootsy” type of artistes.

It was therefore fitting for the audience to demand an encore, despite the late hour of 4:00am. Marley’s return was punctuated with applause as he belted out another hit tune, ‘Welcome to Jamrock’.

Electrifying would be one of the best ways to describe Friday night’s performances. It was a night of super presentations from each of the artistes that appeared, starting with the legendary Lovindeer.i-octane

The evening kicked off with a trademark Performance from Lovindeer who thrilled the crowd with many of his old tunes, including the 1988 hit “Gilbert’ that recounted the damage caused in Jamaica by Hurricane Gilbert that same year. That song resonated well with Kittitians/Nevisians, because back then many used it to highlight the destruction, one year later in 1989, caused in St. Kitts and Nevis by Hurricane Hugo.

Eric Donaldson then followed   and put on an energetic performance, dropping some of his classic tunes such as ‘Cherry Oh Baby’ and ‘Miserable Woman’ often drawing positive reactions from the crowd.

In a chorus of reggae music however, came a wonderful performance by saxophonist Courtney Pine, who was making his debut appearance at the festival. For him, he said, appearing at the St. Kitts Music festival was like a dream being fulfilled. His jazz repertoire was soothing and calming in a sea of reggae and dancehall; but a blend anyhow that must have surprised many.

The family group that has appeared in St. Kitts and Nevis many times, Morgan Heritage, received another warm embrace from their fans here. Though various members of the family have flirted with solo careers, it was a rewarding experience to see them again as a unit that has built a reputation as one of the more entertaining reggae bands of modern times. crowd

The audience responded well to their hit tunes, such as, ‘A Man is Still a Man’ and ‘Tell me How Come’, causing the group to slightly exceed their allotted time, after the crowd refused to let them leave the stage, despite officials indicating that their time had elapsed.

There were also performances from I-Octane and Pocaan.

 

 

 

Damian Marley Wows Festival Audience

Damian Marley proved why his family is still revered as the “royal family” of reggae music. He obviously understood the thirst of the ardent fans, (many who flocked the front stage area), delivering successive tunes that all seemed like crowd favourites.

Damian ‘Jr. Gong’ Marley lived up to the hype of being the headline artiste of the evening, rolling out many of his popular songs which included ‘Beautiful’ and ‘Road to Zion’.

It was a scintillating two hour performance that also revived memories of “Brother Bob”, when Damian introduced a few of his father’s more popular selections, such as “Could you be Loved”.

Friday night at the St. Kitts Music Festival, which traditionally has been called, “Reggae Night”, again proved that this is a winning formula for the event, as it was able to draw one of the largest crowds seen at the annual affair. It was an audience richly blended with visitors and residents, including the usual large pool of members of the Rastafarian faith, who could always be counted on to show support, especially for the more “rootsy” type of artistes.

It was therefore fitting for the audience to demand an encore, despite the late hour of 4:00am. Marley’s return was punctuated with applause as he belted out another hit tune, ‘Welcome to Jamrock’.

Electrifying would be one of the best ways to describe Friday night’s performances. It was a night of super presentations from each of the artistes that appeared, starting with the legendary Lovindeer.

The evening kicked off with a trademark Performance from Lovindeer who thrilled the crowd with many of his old tunes, including the 1988 hit “Gilbert’ that recounted the damage caused in Jamaica by Hurricane Gilbert that same year. That song resonated well with Kittitians/Nevisians, because back then many used it to highlight the destruction, one year later in 1989, caused in St. Kitts and Nevis by Hurricane Hugo.

Eric Donaldson then followed   and put on an energetic performance, dropping some of his classic tunes such as ‘Cherry Oh Baby’ and ‘Miserable Woman’ often drawing positive reactions from the crowd.

In a chorus of reggae music however, came a wonderful performance by saxophonist Courtney Pine, who was making his debut appearance at the festival. For him, he said, appearing at the St. Kitts Music festival was like a dream being fulfilled. His jazz repertoire was soothing and calming in a sea of reggae and dancehall; but a blend anyhow that must have surprised many.

The family group that has appeared in St. Kitts and Nevis many times, Morgan Heritage, received another warm embrace from their fans here. Though various members of the family have flirted with solo careers, it was a rewarding experience to see them again as a unit that has built a reputation as one of the more entertaining reggae bands of modern times.

The audience responded well to their hit tunes, such as, ‘A Man is Still a Man’ and ‘Tell me How Come’, causing the group to slightly exceed their allotted time, after the crowd refused to let them leave the stage, despite officials indicating that their time had elapsed.

There were also performances from I-Octane and Pocaan.

 

 

 

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