First Storm Could Develop from Low-Pressure System, Which is Already Causing Flooding in Caribbean Countries

A Caribbean360 report informs that A broad low-pressure system about 150 miles southwest of Jamaica has some potential to become the first storm of the Atlantic Hurricane Season” and that even before it has reached to that state, “the rains it’s producing have caused major flooding in two Caribbean islands”.

Flooding occurred in Jamaica on Sunday, 5th June, 2011, and the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) reported a suspected drowning at Bob Marley Beach, Nine Miles Bull Bay.

The victim was reported one of two men who were in a fishing boat which was trapped by flood waters; the other individual was rescued and transported to the hospital. The heavy rainfall also resulted in several communities being marooned by flood waters.

A Flash Flood Warning has been issued by the Meteorological Service for low-lying and flood-prone areas of St. Mary, Portland, St. Thomas, St. Catherine, Clarendon, Kingston and St. Andrew and a statement from the ODPEM said the Ministry of Labour and Social and Security has been placed on standby in the event the rains persist into today and tomorrow.

Haiti was also affected by the rainfall and according to reports, the government and international aid groups had to evacuate 56 families from flooded areas because the country’s largest lake, Lake Azuei overflowed.

Concerning the development of the system, according to the National Hurricane Centre (NHC) in Miami, there is a 40 percent possibility of development into a tropical cyclone by 7th June 2011.

“Regardless of development (of the system), heavy rains could cause flash floods and mudslides over portions of Haiti and Jamaica as the system moves slowly towards the northwest or north over the next couple of days,” the NHC said.

(Parts of this article were written with content submitted in a Caribbean360 release)

 

 

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