Migrants break through Croatian police lines at Tovarnik

People waiting for hours in blazing heat at Tavornik grew frustrated, though the situation is quieter now.

Croatia is struggling to deal with at least 7,300 arrivals since Wednesday morning after Hungary closed its border with Serbia, blocking the previous route into the European Union.

EU leaders will hold an emergency summit next week to discuss the crisis.

Croatian officials say migrants must apply for asylum there or be treated as illegal immigrants.

The BBC’s Fergal Keane, in Tavornik, said the trouble began when people began pushing at police to get through.

Riot police were trying to hold back several thousand migrants who had crossed from Serbia.

There was mayhem as Croatian police tried to restore order, with children screaming, women crying and people knocked over, our correspondent adds.

The crowds, who were chanting “we want to go”, had gathered in the baking heat to wait for transport on from the border.

Croatian police eventually gave way under pressure. Many of the migrants said they intended to walk to Slovenia.

Many of the migrants are exhausted with supplies of food and water running low.

Croatia is part of the European Union but is not part of the borderless Schengen area.

The interior minister said Croatia would not be able to take any more migrants.

On Wednesday, hundreds were involved in clashes at the Hungary-Serbia border after Hungarian authorities used water cannon and tear gas to stop migrants forcing their way through.

Separately on Thursday, European Council President Donald Tusk announced that European leaders would meet on 23 September.

The European Parliament voted to back plans for the mandatory relocation of 120,000 refugees around the EU, but interior ministers from EU countries have not so far been able to reach agreement on the plan.

migrants-break-through.90Croatia said it would allow migrants to travel into northern Europe, but officials in Slovenia – which borders Croatia to the north – have said they would tighten their border security and would stick to rules which require asylum-seekers to register on arrival.

Slovenia, like Hungary, is an entry point to the Schengen zone, which normally allows people to travel between member countries without restrictions.

In other developments:

Germany has extended border controls currently in place with Austria to the Czech Republic

The head of the German agency in charge of migration and refugees has resigned, citing personal reasons

Authorities in Paris, France, are evacuating more than 500 migrants from tent camps and offering them accommodation elsewhere

Bulgaria is sending extra troops to its border with Turkey in case of a further influx of refugees, its defence minister says

Hundreds of migrants are stranded near the Turkish city of Edirne, close to the border with Bulgaria and Greece

Austrian railways say services to and from Hungary, suspended on 10 September, will resume on Thursday

Czech PM Bohuslav Sobotka has indicated his country could voluntarily offer asylum to around 10,000 refugees – far more than the 1,500 the Czech Republic has so far agreed to accept.







 

 

Migrants break through Croatian police lines at Tovarnik

People waiting for hours in blazing heat at Tavornik grew frustrated, though the situation is quieter now.

Croatia is struggling to deal with at least 7,300 arrivals since Wednesday morning after Hungary closed its border with Serbia, blocking the previous route into the European Union.

EU leaders will hold an emergency summit next week to discuss the crisis.

Croatian officials say migrants must apply for asylum there or be treated as illegal immigrants.

The BBC’s Fergal Keane, in Tavornik, said the trouble began when people began pushing at police to get through.

Riot police were trying to hold back several thousand migrants who had crossed from Serbia.

There was mayhem as Croatian police tried to restore order, with children screaming, women crying and people knocked over, our correspondent adds.

The crowds, who were chanting “we want to go”, had gathered in the baking heat to wait for transport on from the border.

Croatian police eventually gave way under pressure. Many of the migrants said they intended to walk to Slovenia.

Many of the migrants are exhausted with supplies of food and water running low.

Croatia is part of the European Union but is not part of the borderless Schengen area.

The interior minister said Croatia would not be able to take any more migrants.

On Wednesday, hundreds were involved in clashes at the Hungary-Serbia border after Hungarian authorities used water cannon and tear gas to stop migrants forcing their way through.

Separately on Thursday, European Council President Donald Tusk announced that European leaders would meet on 23 September.

The European Parliament voted to back plans for the mandatory relocation of 120,000 refugees around the EU, but interior ministers from EU countries have not so far been able to reach agreement on the plan.

migrants-break-through.90Croatia said it would allow migrants to travel into northern Europe, but officials in Slovenia – which borders Croatia to the north – have said they would tighten their border security and would stick to rules which require asylum-seekers to register on arrival.

Slovenia, like Hungary, is an entry point to the Schengen zone, which normally allows people to travel between member countries without restrictions.

In other developments:

Germany has extended border controls currently in place with Austria to the Czech Republic

The head of the German agency in charge of migration and refugees has resigned, citing personal reasons

Authorities in Paris, France, are evacuating more than 500 migrants from tent camps and offering them accommodation elsewhere

Bulgaria is sending extra troops to its border with Turkey in case of a further influx of refugees, its defence minister says

Hundreds of migrants are stranded near the Turkish city of Edirne, close to the border with Bulgaria and Greece

Austrian railways say services to and from Hungary, suspended on 10 September, will resume on Thursday

Czech PM Bohuslav Sobotka has indicated his country could voluntarily offer asylum to around 10,000 refugees – far more than the 1,500 the Czech Republic has so far agreed to accept.







 

 

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