Queen Yarini still basking in her glory

However, never mind this disappointment, Morton is hoping to continue her crusade for the social cause she established when entering the Miss National Carnival Pageant last December. She also shared her feelings about her recent success during an exclusive interview with MiyVue.com.

It was a priceless reaction on the face of  23 year-old, Yarayni Morton, that was left imprinted in the hearts of hundreds of screaming spectators, as she was crowned Miss Caribbean Culture Queen in Nevis recently.

Making her pageant debut last year in the National Carnival Queen competition and copping the first runner-up position, Morton is now setting out on a journey to promote her platform of ‘Tolerance’, this she revealed in an exclusive interview with this publication.

The beauty queen explained to MiyVue.com, that her reaction after being announced winner was one of accomplishment, after her intense training and preparation for the big night of competition.

“It was absolutely thrilling to know that all of the hard work and dedication had paid off. Pageantry takes a lot of work and triumph is really amazing,” Morton said.

She said that training for the annual pageant entailed lots of practice and dedication to the preparatory sessions which can take a lot away from the regular things of life.

“It took a lot of practicing and sitting through ideas while trying to figure what works best. Most of all, it calls for a lot of time management in dealing with pageants and regular life and finding a balance.” Morton explained.

When quizzed on the recent success of the reigning National Carnival Queen, Kaeve Armstrong, on the regional scene and what it meant for pageantry in St Kitts, Morton said, “St. Kitts has an enormous amount of talent and beauty. We have a high quality of pageantry on the island and Kaeve and I have set the bar high.”

Morton noted that with the caliber of ambassadorial beauties in the Federation, she is confident that the same high standards will continue to be exhibited in both regional and international pageants.

MiyVue.com: “There are many young women who see only the glitz and glamour of pageantry, as a former contestant and regional beauty queen, can you explain to young women out there, what pageantry involves in terms of platform and voluntary work.”

Yarini: “I too at one point saw only the glamour side of pageantry. Not necessarily the recognition, but all the pretty and glitz it entailed. Now that I have become a beauty queen and a former contestant, I now understand what it means to be in pageantry.”

“You become a mentor and a role model, so you have to act accordingly. With all the information you have taken from your platform, you have to apply that in your daily living and make sure you live up to what it is you want to do.”

“Believe me, that is not an easy task. Especially when it comes to being out and about in different places trying to make sure that whatever you do is professional. In addition to that, the voluntary work is very time consuming but it is rewarding and you have to make sure you find the time in your daily life to assist others in order to make sure you’re a good person in every aspect of life.”

MiyVue.com – What is your advice to young women, especially those who are getting ready for Miss Carnival later in the year, especially winning and making a difference in St. Kitts?

Yarini – “Well first of all, pageantry should never be about the glamour that comes with it. So my advice is from now, start preparing. I don’t think we have a true understanding of how much it takes to compete in a national pageant.”

“It takes a lot of time, effort and preparation for such competitions. In addition, I would say not to look at the prize of the pageant, but to make sure they get a little more out of that. It’s a life lesson and an opportunity to express yourself in a way that you probably never would be able to.”

“I would also urge them to capitalize and have a new opportunity to look for a social issue and not take it lightly. Choose a cause that is personal to them as I did with my campaign about Tolerance.”

Yarini explained that because she had to switch jobs, it has become very difficult for her to put into place some of the ideas that she has, noting  that as a one man ambassador for the cause of tolerance…this is the start of a yearlong campaign.

Unfortunately, Morton was hit with a few setbacks in her quest to leave her mark on the regional stage when she was forced to withdraw her participation from the 2014 Miss Jamzone International Pageant in Guyana.

According to Morton, short notice, high airfare and the lack of sponsorship were some of the challenges she encountered while seeking to represent the Federation at the 2014 international event in the Land of Many Waters.

She hopes to represent her country at the 2015 edition of the pageant in Georgetown, Guyana. 



 

  

Queen Yarini still basking in her glory

However, never mind this disappointment, Morton is hoping to continue her crusade for the social cause she established when entering the Miss National Carnival Pageant last December. She also shared her feelings about her recent success during an exclusive interview with MiyVue.com.

It was a priceless reaction on the face of  23 year-old, Yarayni Morton, that was left imprinted in the hearts of hundreds of screaming spectators, as she was crowned Miss Caribbean Culture Queen in Nevis recently.

Making her pageant debut last year in the National Carnival Queen competition and copping the first runner-up position, Morton is now setting out on a journey to promote her platform of ‘Tolerance’, this she revealed in an exclusive interview with this publication.

The beauty queen explained to MiyVue.com, that her reaction after being announced winner was one of accomplishment, after her intense training and preparation for the big night of competition.

“It was absolutely thrilling to know that all of the hard work and dedication had paid off. Pageantry takes a lot of work and triumph is really amazing,” Morton said.

She said that training for the annual pageant entailed lots of practice and dedication to the preparatory sessions which can take a lot away from the regular things of life.

“It took a lot of practicing and sitting through ideas while trying to figure what works best. Most of all, it calls for a lot of time management in dealing with pageants and regular life and finding a balance.” Morton explained.

When quizzed on the recent success of the reigning National Carnival Queen, Kaeve Armstrong, on the regional scene and what it meant for pageantry in St Kitts, Morton said, “St. Kitts has an enormous amount of talent and beauty. We have a high quality of pageantry on the island and Kaeve and I have set the bar high.”

Morton noted that with the caliber of ambassadorial beauties in the Federation, she is confident that the same high standards will continue to be exhibited in both regional and international pageants.

MiyVue.com: “There are many young women who see only the glitz and glamour of pageantry, as a former contestant and regional beauty queen, can you explain to young women out there, what pageantry involves in terms of platform and voluntary work.”

Yarini: “I too at one point saw only the glamour side of pageantry. Not necessarily the recognition, but all the pretty and glitz it entailed. Now that I have become a beauty queen and a former contestant, I now understand what it means to be in pageantry.”

“You become a mentor and a role model, so you have to act accordingly. With all the information you have taken from your platform, you have to apply that in your daily living and make sure you live up to what it is you want to do.”

“Believe me, that is not an easy task. Especially when it comes to being out and about in different places trying to make sure that whatever you do is professional. In addition to that, the voluntary work is very time consuming but it is rewarding and you have to make sure you find the time in your daily life to assist others in order to make sure you’re a good person in every aspect of life.”

MiyVue.com – What is your advice to young women, especially those who are getting ready for Miss Carnival later in the year, especially winning and making a difference in St. Kitts?

Yarini – “Well first of all, pageantry should never be about the glamour that comes with it. So my advice is from now, start preparing. I don’t think we have a true understanding of how much it takes to compete in a national pageant.”

“It takes a lot of time, effort and preparation for such competitions. In addition, I would say not to look at the prize of the pageant, but to make sure they get a little more out of that. It’s a life lesson and an opportunity to express yourself in a way that you probably never would be able to.”

“I would also urge them to capitalize and have a new opportunity to look for a social issue and not take it lightly. Choose a cause that is personal to them as I did with my campaign about Tolerance.”

Yarini explained that because she had to switch jobs, it has become very difficult for her to put into place some of the ideas that she has, noting  that as a one man ambassador for the cause of tolerance…this is the start of a yearlong campaign.

Unfortunately, Morton was hit with a few setbacks in her quest to leave her mark on the regional stage when she was forced to withdraw her participation from the 2014 Miss Jamzone International Pageant in Guyana.

According to Morton, short notice, high airfare and the lack of sponsorship were some of the challenges she encountered while seeking to represent the Federation at the 2014 international event in the Land of Many Waters.

She hopes to represent her country at the 2015 edition of the pageant in Georgetown, Guyana. 



 

  

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