Resignation of Guyana police commissioner disputed


Luncheon said at his post-Cabinet media briefing on Thursday that the government will take a decision based on ethics as it relates to the issue involving Greene, who admitted to having consensual sex with a woman who later accused him of raping her.

Luncheon said, “We (government) want to make decisions that are beyond contention; we would like to be on the correct and safe side and adopt a position that addresses the concerns of all in this matter.”

In assuming that the criminal aspect of the matter has been resolved by Chief Justice Ian Chang’s ruling to dismiss the rape charge against the commissioner of police, Luncheon explained that, in the absence of an appeal, the chief justice’s ruling would be maintained and this will allow the government to conclude deliberations on the issue of ethics. 

According to Luncheon, Greene is still the commissioner of police and the issue involving him is under discussion, hence the calls for his resignation could only be directed to him and not to the government since any move to dismiss Greene has to be done in accordance with the constitution and not based on calls from the opposition or other bodies. 

He explained further that although the government can terminate the agreement with Greene, “in dispensing with the services of a Commissioner, it is not merely pulling the plug… as the constitution prescribes the process for removing the Commissioner.” 

The HPS affirmed that the Jamaican police who were present during the investigation into the Greene issue provided support to the investigators from the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) as only ranks from that unit can conduct such an investigation. 

The findings from the investigation formed a consolidated report which was presented to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) on which the advice to charge Greene with rape was made.

Resignation of Guyana police commissioner disputed

Luncheon said at his post-Cabinet media briefing on Thursday that the government will take a decision based on ethics as it relates to the issue involving Greene, who admitted to having consensual sex with a woman who later accused him of raping her.

Luncheon said, “We (government) want to make decisions that are beyond contention; we would like to be on the correct and safe side and adopt a position that addresses the concerns of all in this matter.”

In assuming that the criminal aspect of the matter has been resolved by Chief Justice Ian Chang’s ruling to dismiss the rape charge against the commissioner of police, Luncheon explained that, in the absence of an appeal, the chief justice’s ruling would be maintained and this will allow the government to conclude deliberations on the issue of ethics.

According to Luncheon, Greene is still the commissioner of police and the issue involving him is under discussion, hence the calls for his resignation could only be directed to him and not to the government since any move to dismiss Greene has to be done in accordance with the constitution and not based on calls from the opposition or other bodies.

He explained further that although the government can terminate the agreement with Greene, “in dispensing with the services of a Commissioner, it is not merely pulling the plug… as the constitution prescribes the process for removing the Commissioner.”

The HPS affirmed that the Jamaican police who were present during the investigation into the Greene issue provided support to the investigators from the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) as only ranks from that unit can conduct such an investigation.

The findings from the investigation formed a consolidated report which was presented to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) on which the advice to charge Greene with rape was made.

 

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