Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type bool in /home/customer/www/myvuenews.com/public_html/wp-content/themes/daily-news/functions.php on line 309

Sports and marijuana do not go well together, says CARIFTA anti-doping official

According to Chaderton-Shaw, such substances can destroy their health and sporting career and cause untold embarrassment to themselves, their families and their countries. 

“I think any athlete worth his or her salt should not be smoking any substance,” Chaderton-Shaw said. “Doping is fundamentally contrary to the spirit of sports. It is better to lose with dignity than to win by cheating.”

Chaderton-Shaw has a team of anti-doping officials at the 44th CARIFTA Games being held in St. Kitts at the recently renamed Kim Collins Athletics Stadium from April 3-6.

The anti-doping team is in St. Kitts primarily to provide anti-doping education and testing for athletes and their entourage participating in the games.

She said that cannabinoids found in marijuana stay in the fatty tissue of the body up to six weeks. The anti-doping official says that they want to impress upon the young athletes the concept of strict liability, that is, they are totally responsible for what they put into their bodies.

“Coaches, team managers, doctors, physiotherapists should also be part of the anti-doping process,” Chaderton-Shaw said.

St. Kitts and Nevis’ board member of Caribbean Rado, Leroy Greene, said that he has been on an anti-doping campaign in St. Kitts and Nevis by visiting schools, clubs, and teams on a regular basis.

“We can no longer say that we are a small country in the Caribbean. All the anti-doping protocols apply to every country, big and small,” Mr. Greene said.

Among the substances banned or should be avoided are marijuana, alcohol, cough medicines, performance enhancing drugs and supplements. In fact, Greene admonishes all athletes not to use supplements, as very often, all the ingredients are not listed.

Greene warns of serious consequences for using banned substances. Athletes who test positive could face legal challenges, warnings, suspensions and bans up to four years long. Using performance enhancing substances is unethical, a notion that he is trying to instill in young athletes.

“Sports is one of the avenues we use to work with these young people,” Mr. Greene said. “If you cheat in sports, chances are you will cheat in other areas of your life, and we want to have clean productive citizens.”

Mr. Greene underscored that ethical values, health values and educational values should be pushed in sports.

Chaderton-Shaw said that the “Olympic values of honesty, excellence, dedication, character and respect are values that all of us as a people should uphold.”

The Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Organization is based in Barbados and acts as the secretariat for anti-doping issues for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, the Bahamas, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos.

The Caribbean RADO is a member of the Institute of National Anti-Doping Organizations (iNADO) and is supported by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Sports and marijuana do not go well together, says CARIFTA anti-doping official

“I think any athlete worth his or her salt should not be smoking any substance,” Chaderton-Shaw said. “Doping is fundamentally contrary to the spirit of sports. It is better to lose with dignity than to win by cheating.”

Chaderton-Shaw has a team of anti-doping officials at the 44th CARIFTA Games being held in St. Kitts at the recently renamed Kim Collins Athletics Stadium from April 3-6.

The anti-doping team is in St. Kitts primarily to provide anti-doping education and testing for athletes and their entourage participating in the games.

She said that cannabinoids found in marijuana stay in the fatty tissue of the body up to six weeks. The anti-doping official says that they want to impress upon the young athletes the concept of strict liability, that is, they are totally responsible for what they put into their bodies.

“Coaches, team managers, doctors, physiotherapists should also be part of the anti-doping process,” Chaderton-Shaw said.

St. Kitts and Nevis’ board member of Caribbean Rado, Leroy Greene, said that he has been on an anti-doping campaign in St. Kitts and Nevis by visiting schools, clubs, and teams on a regular basis.

“We can no longer say that we are a small country in the Caribbean. All the anti-doping protocols apply to every country, big and small,” Mr. Greene said.

Among the substances banned or should be avoided are marijuana, alcohol, cough medicines, performance enhancing drugs and supplements. In fact, Greene admonishes all athletes not to use supplements, as very often, all the ingredients are not listed.

Greene warns of serious consequences for using banned substances. Athletes who test positive could face legal challenges, warnings, suspensions and bans up to four years long. Using performance enhancing substances is unethical, a notion that he is trying to instill in young athletes.

“Sports is one of the avenues we use to work with these young people,” Mr. Greene said. “If you cheat in sports, chances are you will cheat in other areas of your life, and we want to have clean productive citizens.”

Mr. Greene underscored that ethical values, health values and educational values should be pushed in sports.

Chaderton-Shaw said that the “Olympic values of honesty, excellence, dedication, character and respect are values that all of us as a people should uphold.”

The Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Organization is based in Barbados and acts as the secretariat for anti-doping issues for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, the Bahamas, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos.

The Caribbean RADO is a member of the Institute of National Anti-Doping Organizations (iNADO) and is supported by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Sports and marijuana do not go well together, says CARIFTA anti-doping official

“I think any athlete worth his or her salt should not be smoking any substance,” Chaderton-Shaw said. “Doping is fundamentally contrary to the spirit of sports. It is better to lose with dignity than to win by cheating.”

Chaderton-Shaw has a team of anti-doping officials at the 44th CARIFTA Games being held in St. Kitts at the recently renamed Kim Collins Athletics Stadium from April 3-6.

The anti-doping team is in St. Kitts primarily to provide anti-doping education and testing for athletes and their entourage participating in the games.

She said that cannabinoids found in marijuana stay in the fatty tissue of the body up to six weeks. The anti-doping official says that they want to impress upon the young athletes the concept of strict liability, that is, they are totally responsible for what they put into their bodies.

“Coaches, team managers, doctors, physiotherapists should also be part of the anti-doping process,” Chaderton-Shaw said.

St. Kitts and Nevis’ board member of Caribbean Rado, Leroy Greene, said that he has been on an anti-doping campaign in St. Kitts and Nevis by visiting schools, clubs, and teams on a regular basis.

“We can no longer say that we are a small country in the Caribbean. All the anti-doping protocols apply to every country, big and small,” Mr. Greene said.

Among the substances banned or should be avoided are marijuana, alcohol, cough medicines, performance enhancing drugs and supplements. In fact, Greene admonishes all athletes not to use supplements, as very often, all the ingredients are not listed.

Greene warns of serious consequences for using banned substances. Athletes who test positive could face legal challenges, warnings, suspensions and bans up to four years long. Using performance enhancing substances is unethical, a notion that he is trying to instill in young athletes.

“Sports is one of the avenues we use to work with these young people,” Mr. Greene said. “If you cheat in sports, chances are you will cheat in other areas of your life, and we want to have clean productive citizens.”

Mr. Greene underscored that ethical values, health values and educational values should be pushed in sports.

Chaderton-Shaw said that the “Olympic values of honesty, excellence, dedication, character and respect are values that all of us as a people should uphold.”

The Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Organization is based in Barbados and acts as the secretariat for anti-doping issues for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, the Bahamas, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos.

The Caribbean RADO is a member of the Institute of National Anti-Doping Organizations (iNADO) and is supported by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Leave a Reply

error: Content is protected !!